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19 April 2010

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bob eisengrein

As the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima is commemorated today, Robert Eisengrein of Acton only has to go to a journal he wrote and photographs he took there in 1945 to remember what happened. Near ground zero, the epicenter of the blast, everything was flattened, almost as far as he could see. All that remained of tall buildings were frames. He saw twisted bicycles, and glass objects that had melted and fused into eerie shapes. "The intense heat didn't leave anything," he said in recollection Clicking on the hyperlink below to read the complete article.
..\globe article on japan oddyssey\Shortcut to One day in Hiroshima, a lifetime of images - Boston Globe Subscriber
Negotiations alone will not solve the disarmament problem. Another approach is needed which will vividly described the consequences of using nuclear weapons – the horrible affects of radiation on the population. We now need a widespread and intense PR campaign to educate the rogue nations and their population, with pictures and brief text and twitter, on the horrors facing their population.

The most natural format for the suggested campaign is the worldwide Internet. It can easily provide the means for a long range program of repeated and well planned sound bite pictures and words. The Rogues Internet networks should be repeatedly penetrated by professional software techniques on a continuing basis as they attempt to counteract our vivid messages. It will be a war – repetitious and annoying - but effective if we persist! We have so much to gain and so little to lose!

The links below outline the radiation cover-up and: damage by radiation.

http://www.thewe.cc/weplanet/news/asia/japan/hiroshima_cover_up.htm


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